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History

A Brief History of Totton & Eling

The town has a history back to before Bronze Age times. It is thought the name Eling probably derives from Edlas’s people, or Edlingas as it appeared in the Domesday Book. The name Totton could derive from a tribe of early English, being the home of Tota’s people.

Brief timeline of historical events:

1500 BC
A Bronze Age Settlement to the North of the Town was established. When the Testwood Lakes were excavated, a jetty, bridge and dagger were all found dating from that period.

1086 AD
At the time of the Domesday Survey, the Parish of Eling had a population of about 300 and recorded a Church, 2 mills, a fishery and a salt house.

1130 AD
Henry I sailed from the quay at Eling on one of his expeditions to Normandy.

1808 AD to 1814 AD
Because of its natural harbour and tides, Eling has a long history of shipbuilding. Of particular note during this time were the Warwick family, who built 6 ships for the Royal Navy at Eling.

1847
The railway arrived in Totton. At the time there was no station at Eling, although by 1857 Eling Junction was shown on railway timetables and Totton Station was finally completed in 1859.

Present Day
Totton and Eling has become a thriving town, and the population has grown from 4,000 at the end of the 19th Century to nearly 30,000 today.